Pedestrian Accidents on Halloween

When you were a kid, you were probably warned about the dangers of poisonous candy. Your parents probably said something to the effect of, “Never eat unwrapped candy – it could be poisoned!” While we’ve come to learn that that was mostly un Urban Legend, many parents fail to realize that the real dangers of Halloween involve: 1) drunk drivers, and 2) pedestrian accidents.

“But of all dangers, car accidents are among the most common, and one doctors say families do not think about enough. Children are more than twice as likely to be killed by a car while walking on Halloween night than at any other time of the year, according to the organization Safe Kids USA,” reported U.S. News & World Report. Dr. Rebecca Parker, chairwoman of the American College of Emergency Physicians’ board of directors told U.S. News & World Report that this is the time when there is an increase in children being hit and killed by cars.

Parents Beware of These Dangers

Parents, be aware of the following dangers for your children on Halloween:

  • Getting hit by a car.
  • Drunk drivers.
  • Long costumes, which can cause tripping.
  • Masks, which affect children’s ability to see.
  • Glow sticks, which are harmful if the liquid is swallowed or if it gets into the eyes.
  • Face paints, especially those made in China contain heavy metals, such as lead, cobalt, chromium and nickel, which can be dangerous for the children who use face paint as a part of a costume. If lead from face paint is ingested, it can travel from the bloodstream to the brain, causing damage weeks or months after Halloween.
  • Candy can lead to choking, especially if it’s hard or difficult to swallow.

Parents, to ensure your kids are safe on Halloween, check out this infographic from Safe Kids Worldwide™ entitled, “Quick Tips For a Safe Halloween.”

If you need to file a personal injury claim in Columbia, SC, contact the Law Office of James R. Snell, Jr., LLC today!

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